Culture

La Casa, also known as Spanish House, is unique amongst MIT's living groups. Our community was founded to celebrated Latino culture and the Spanish language. While we are a part of the larger New House community, we are also our own community with our own culture, meal plan, and government. Having the power to govern ourselves gives us an advantage over other more traditional dorm communities. We distribute funds in a way that is most beneficial to all members of Spanish House, and each member has the opportunity to share their opinion and vote on house policy. Together we elect members, decide where to take trips, participate in recreational sports, and host events.


Meal Plan

All residents in Spanish House are part of the House Meal Plan. Each member prepares dinner or study break for the house along with their cooking partner once every other week. The week that they don't cook, they setup and clean. Not only is the meal plan only about $70 per month, house dinners are also a great way to socialize with other members of the house. Part of what makes La Casa a family is the dinners we have each night after class. It allows members to take a break from studying and spend time eating and relaxing with friends. Furthermore, the meal plan is a great opportunity for members to learn how to make delicious meals. New members are paired with more experienced cooking partners.


Tour the House


Residence Based Advising

Residence-Based Advising (RBA) is one of the qualities that makes Spanish House unique amongst MIT's living groups and dorms. Like Next House and McCormick, Spanish House has Residence Based advising. In RBA, freshmen live in Spanish House for their first year and all have the same advisor, who advises the freshmen from year to year. The Resident Associate Advisor is a fellow undergrad who lives in Spanish House and is their to answer any questions that freshmen have about classes, activities, etc. This program ensures that our freshmen succeed at MIT.


Government

La Casa has its own government, constitution, and taxes. Each month the house has a general body meeting to discuss important events and, if necessary, make amendments to the constitution. The government is a mixture of a direct and representative democracy. All house members may vote on issues at the GBMs, and amendments must be passed by the entire house. Representatives meet at least once a month to plan events and discuss any issues in the house.